Titans and Titanesses 

According to the “Theogony” of Hesiod, Uranus, the God of heaven, beget with his mother, Gaia, the Earth Goddess, the Titans and Titanesses, the Cyclops and the Hecatoncheires. 
The Titans, led by Cronos dethroned and mutilated Uranus. His blood again fertilized Gaia, giving birth to the Erinyes, or Furies, who would be in charge of patricide and avenge certain crimes. The Titans, are twelve, six men (Titans): Ocean, Ceo, Krios, Hyperion, Lapetus and Cronus, and six women (Titanesses): Phoebe, Mnemosyne, Rhea, Themis, Thetis and Tea. Often called the old gods, they were longtime owners of the supreme universe.

Titans and Titanesses 

According to the “Theogony” of Hesiod, Uranus, the God of heaven, beget with his mother, Gaia, the Earth Goddess, the Titans and Titanesses, the Cyclops and the Hecatoncheires.

The Titans, led by Cronos dethroned and mutilated Uranus. His blood again fertilized Gaia, giving birth to the Erinyes, or Furies, who would be in charge of patricide and avenge certain crimes. The Titans, are twelve, six men (Titans): Ocean, Ceo, Krios, Hyperion, Lapetus and Cronus, and six women (Titanesses): Phoebe, Mnemosyne, Rhea, Themis, Thetis and Tea. Often called the old gods, they were longtime owners of the supreme universe.




La Llorona

The best antecedent known of the story of La Llorona legend has its roots in Aztec mythology. One version holds that it is the Aztec goddess Chihuacóatl, the protector of the race. They say that before the Spanish conquest, a female figure dressed in white began to appear regularly on the waters of Lake Texcoco roaming the hills and terrorizing the inhabitants of Tenochtitlan.
"Oh, my children, where will I take them to escape this doom?"she lamented.
A group of priests decided to consult old omens. The ancient warned that the goddess Chihuacóalt would appear to announce the fall of the Aztec empire by men from the East. The apparition was the sixth sign of the end of the civilization. With the arrival of the Spaniards to America, and once finished the conquest of Tenochtitlan, the seat of the Aztec Empire, years later and after Doña Marina died, better known as the “Malinche” (a young Aztec that became lover of the Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortes), it was said that she was the Llorona, who came to grieve from the other world for betraying her race, helping foreigners for their submission.
The “Other” Lloronas
This legend spread to other parts of the country, manifesting itself in various ways. In some towns, said the Llorona was a young lover who had died on the eve of the wedding and brought the crown of white roses she never used, to her groom.
Elsewhere, was believed to be a mother who came to mourn his orphan children.
Some say it is a woman who drowned her children one night and it’s seen along streams or creeks, exhaling long laments.
Others say is an unpleasant figure of a woman, tall and disheveled, using a long dress and with cadaverous face. Her long arms are holding a dead child and she spends the night crying, seeding with pitiful sobs, the terror on fields, villages, and even in cities.

La Llorona

The best antecedent known of the story of La Llorona legend has its roots in Aztec mythology. One version holds that it is the Aztec goddess Chihuacóatl, the protector of the race. They say that before the Spanish conquest, a female figure dressed in white began to appear regularly on the waters of Lake Texcoco roaming the hills and terrorizing the inhabitants of Tenochtitlan.

"Oh, my children, where will I take them to escape this doom?"she lamented.

A group of priests decided to consult old omens. The ancient warned that the goddess Chihuacóalt would appear to announce the fall of the Aztec empire by men from the East. The apparition was the sixth sign of the end of the civilization. With the arrival of the Spaniards to America, and once finished the conquest of Tenochtitlan, the seat of the Aztec Empire, years later and after Doña Marina died, better known as the “Malinche” (a young Aztec that became lover of the Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortes), it was said that she was the Llorona, who came to grieve from the other world for betraying her race, helping foreigners for their submission.

The “Other” Lloronas

  • This legend spread to other parts of the country, manifesting itself in various ways. In some towns, said the Llorona was a young lover who had died on the eve of the wedding and brought the crown of white roses she never used, to her groom.
  • Elsewhere, was believed to be a mother who came to mourn his orphan children.
  • Some say it is a woman who drowned her children one night and it’s seen along streams or creeks, exhaling long laments.
  • Others say is an unpleasant figure of a woman, tall and disheveled, using a long dress and with cadaverous face. Her long arms are holding a dead child and she spends the night crying, seeding with pitiful sobs, the terror on fields, villages, and even in cities.



The Aswang (Philippine Ghoul)

An Aswang (or Asuwang) is a ghoul in Filipino folklore. The trademark or major feature of aswangs which distinguish them from other Filipino mythological creatures is their propensity to replace stolen cadavers with the trunk of a banana tree carved in the cadaver’s likeness. They are also said to like to eat small children. Their favorite body parts are the liver and heart. They usually live near the mountains and they never go in to cities. 
An aswang is a regular townsperson by day and prefer an occupation related to meat, such as butchery or making sausages. Aswangs have an ageless appearance and a quiet, shy and elusive manner. They can be distinguished from humans by two signs. 
One is the bloodshot eyes from staying up all night looking for opportunities to sneak into houses where funeral wakes are being held, and stealing the dead bodies. 
According to the elderly, the aswang can also transform from human to animal and animal to human. The aswang can disguise him/herself as a pig, dog or a black bird. Supposedly if a person looks at them in the eyes, the reflection would appear inverted. During their nocturnal activities, they walk with their feet facing backwards and toenails reversed. One type is the tik-tik which transforms into a huge bird/bat at night and prowls. The tik-tik looks for a pregnant person. Then extends a very long proboscis into the womb and licks the baby to kill it. While performing, a ‘tik-tik’ sound is heard. In some stories, the tik-tik is an aswang’s familiar, said to confuse people by its ‘tik-tik’ sound. If the aswang is near, the sound would be faint so that people hearing it would think that the aswang is still far away. 
picture credit

The Aswang (Philippine Ghoul)

An Aswang (or Asuwang) is a ghoul in Filipino folklore. The trademark or major feature of aswangs which distinguish them from other Filipino mythological creatures is their propensity to replace stolen cadavers with the trunk of a banana tree carved in the cadaver’s likeness. They are also said to like to eat small children. Their favorite body parts are the liver and heart. They usually live near the mountains and they never go in to cities.

An aswang is a regular townsperson by day and prefer an occupation related to meat, such as butchery or making sausages. Aswangs have an ageless appearance and a quiet, shy and elusive manner. They can be distinguished from humans by two signs.

One is the bloodshot eyes from staying up all night looking for opportunities to sneak into houses where funeral wakes are being held, and stealing the dead bodies.

According to the elderly, the aswang can also transform from human to animal and animal to human. The aswang can disguise him/herself as a pig, dog or a black bird. Supposedly if a person looks at them in the eyes, the reflection would appear inverted. During their nocturnal activities, they walk with their feet facing backwards and toenails reversed. One type is the tik-tik which transforms into a huge bird/bat at night and prowls. The tik-tik looks for a pregnant person. Then extends a very long proboscis into the womb and licks the baby to kill it. While performing, a ‘tik-tik’ sound is heard. In some stories, the tik-tik is an aswang’s familiar, said to confuse people by its ‘tik-tik’ sound. If the aswang is near, the sound would be faint so that people hearing it would think that the aswang is still far away. 

picture credit




Minghun

In Chinese tradition, a ghost marriage (Chinese: 冥婚; pinyin: mínghūn; literally “spirit marriage”) is a marriage in which one or both parties are deceased.
Chinese ghost marriage was usually set up by the family of the deceased and performed for a number of reasons, including: the marriage of a couple previously engaged before one member’s death,to integrate an unmarried daughter into a patrilineage,to ensure the family line is continued,or to maintain that no younger brother is married before an elder brother.
If a family wishes to arrange a ghost marriage, they may consult with matchmaker of sorts: In a Cantonese area of Singapore there is in fact a ghost marriage broker’s sign hung up in a doorway of a Taoist priest’s home. The broker announces that he is willing to undertake the search for a family which has a suitable deceased member with a favourable horoscope.
Others do not use the aid of any priest or diviner, but believe that the groom the ghost-bride has chosen "somehow identify himself. ”Typically, the family lays a red envelope (usually used for gifts of money) as bait in the middle of the road. They then take to hiding, and when the envelope is picked up by a passer-by, they come out and announce his status of being the chosen bridegroom.

Minghun

In Chinese tradition, a ghost marriage (Chinese: 冥婚; pinyin: mínghūn; literally “spirit marriage”) is a marriage in which one or both parties are deceased.

Chinese ghost marriage was usually set up by the family of the deceased and performed for a number of reasons, including: the marriage of a couple previously engaged before one member’s death,to integrate an unmarried daughter into a patrilineage,to ensure the family line is continued,or to maintain that no younger brother is married before an elder brother.

If a family wishes to arrange a ghost marriage, they may consult with matchmaker of sorts: In a Cantonese area of Singapore there is in fact a ghost marriage broker’s sign hung up in a doorway of a Taoist priest’s home. The broker announces that he is willing to undertake the search for a family which has a suitable deceased member with a favourable horoscope.

Others do not use the aid of any priest or diviner, but believe that the groom the ghost-bride has chosen "somehow identify himself. ”Typically, the family lays a red envelope (usually used for gifts of money) as bait in the middle of the road. They then take to hiding, and when the envelope is picked up by a passer-by, they come out and announce his status of being the chosen bridegroom.